Apple Shines for Me


Apple Shines for Me
My 10-month-old Mac crashed a few weeks ago. I called the Apple Store and a very professional and polite service guy who spoke American guided me through 45 minutes worth of help. We both thought we had the problem solved but were wrong. I called the Apple Store, waited a mere five minutes before getting a guy who spoke English with only the slightest accent. He guided me through five minutes until we hit a certain screen.
“Your machine needs to be sent to our repair center,” he said. “We’ll send you the mailing box.” (I don’t know if I’m getting the jargon exact but it’s the message that’s important here).
“How long does the repair process take?”
“Five to seven days. Usually no more than seven.”
The next day the box arrived with very detailed instructions on how to pack it correctly.
I called the delivery agency, got a recorded set of messages which were actually painless and a little fun to listen to as I was being guided through the pick-up instructions. The agency picked the box up on Monday.
When I came home from work Thursday, I had my Mac back.
I it hooked and it worked like new. They had replaced the hard drive.
I compared this with the service I’ve had on my pc’s over the years. Wait. There is no comparison.
I bought the Mac because I was sucked in by the “cool” factor and I needed a tax write-off.
The lesson for me? “Cool” is cool but the friendly, efficient staff and lightning service makes me an Apple fan for a long, long time.
It applies to all of us in higher ed whether we’re in marketing or dealing with an individual student with a problem.
Apple folks made me feel important, that my problem was important and then they delivered on the service surprisingly fast.
How often do we happily surprise our customers?
I think not often enough.
Apple did.
And in today’s society, where customers have blogs, podcasts and videos, it’s more important than ever, whether you sell computers or education.

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