Tag Archives: chris brogan

Sunday Afternoon Thoughts Part 16

In my last post, guest Dick Jones wrote about the demise of newspapers, happening in part because they refuse to let go of their double digit profits. Ad Age has begun a series entitled Newspaper Death Watch. The first installment mentions many of the same problems Dick did. I’ll be following this series and provide a link to each installment. Intriguing stuff.

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Related to the death of newspapers and the huge transition we’re experiencing in news gathering- dissemination (and PR and marketing) is Chris Brogan’s post on Some Differences Between Pitching Mainstream Press and Bloggers. There are some marked differences and, of course, a lot of similarities.

Most revealing are the responses when Chris Twittered his friends for their opinions. Read this in full and think about it. There’s a lot about passion, opinions, homework, freebies . . .oh, yes, and pimping.

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Martin Weller is a Professor of Educational Technology at the Open University in the UK. I’ve subscribed to his blog, The Ed Techie for quite awhile but, like everyone else, I don’t get to all my feeds as often as I’d like.

In the virtual world this April 7 post, Whither the Blogosphere, might be considered old, but it’s relevant, well-written and thoughtful. It’s about the possible trend of bloggers moving away from the blogosphere and into different forms of communication on the Web. Martin writes in part:

What I think is happening is another example of technology succession. The blog was the primary colonizer for the barren landscape of online identity. The presence of this colonizer changed the environment, which made it more amenable to secondary colonizers. . .

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I found this interesting entry on The Ed Techie’s recent post, Making Connections 2.0

Blogger Tony Hirst was criticized harshly at a conference for having his laptop to do some live blogging. Both his account and the comments give some great insights into the schism between traditionalists and 2.0 practitioners.

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John C. Dvorak, VP at the former Podshow, explains the name change to Mevio. His post is short and to the point. The 68 responses range from agreement, to anger to thoughts on the term “podcasting,” branding, search engines, etc. Again, interesting insights into our fast-changing times.

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Finally, I need your insights and ideas.

Three weeks ago I did the three-part post on the drug bust. A week later I followed it up with a report on another one. As I posted them, each one attracted a larger-than-usual number of views. They continued to get a steady but lower number of views, which is the norm. Then, Friday night, views of these posts suddenly jumped way, way up. The views continued growing throughout Saturday, giving me one of my top five days ever. Has this ever happened to anyone else?

Any ideas as to why this seemingly untimely explosion of interest?

Sunday Afternoon Thoughts: Part 3

A “lake effect” blizzard just passed through complete with thunder. I keep thinking, “We’re one day closer to spring. . . .” Right now I’m working on three blogs and a podcast. I interviewed Ed Washington, a black English professor about the importance of Black History Month. The conversation led to the 57-year-old prof’s personal experiences growing up in the 50’s and ‘60s. It’s a moving account that encapsulates the culture’s struggle for human rights.

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BlogHighEd, the aggregator site created by Matt Herzeberger and Brad J. Ward is amazing. The day after they went live my hits soared. So, again, thanks for including me, and keep up your great energy!

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People should really think hard about the name of their business or site. I was searching for paperback titles of William Ard, on whom I’m creating a modest site. I came across a title on Ebay . The dealer’s site was named “dusty crap.” I went no further.

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Re: The Old College Try’s post about high school students not reading college recruiting magazines. I was doing a focus group with a group of the brightest seniors in a good school. I asked them about a very respected and aggressive publication. None had heard of it. The guidance counselor said, “We have a whole pile of them in the office!” He ran out and brought copies back. They nodded and returned to the discussion. I had a heart-to-heart talk with the magazine rep, and he said most students use the magazine to go to the publication’s website. Of course, once they go to the site they don’t need the magazine anymore.

Conclusion? I only advertise in magazines that have high-traffic Web sites.

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Brad J. Ward is documenting his Facebook project at Butler. Since Mansfield University is developing a new Content Management System, I’m really interested in following his progress.

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Checking out other blogs is time-consuming but rewarding as you can see by a couple of the above sites and by Matt Herberger’s post on using WordPress. I didn’t even know about template tags. . . .

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Read Mark Greenfield’s post on on “Seven Inviolable, Irrefutable Things You Can Do On The Internet. He sums it from the Book The Revolution Will Not Be Televised . . . .

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Chris Brogan has a really good post on creating and Social Media and Social Networking Starting Points.

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Bob Johnson’s blog on Internet Marketing is always interesting. Check out this one on the Pew Internet Survey on “Defining ‘reality’ in 2020.”

Or go directly to the Pew site.

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I’ve been in higher ed for more than 30 years and have a lot of Baby Boomer colleagues around the country. I’m thinking of doing an occasional blog on “What’s the Most Important Thing You’ve Learned?” I would take a specific topic such as “interpersonal communications,” or “introducing new ideas,” or even “surviving in higher education,” and asking one or two of these veterans for their thoughts/advice.

Let me know if you think it’s worth pursuing.

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Gotta go fire up the snow blower. . . .