Tag Archives: mevio

Some Favorite Sites, Part 1

I just discovered For Immediate Release on a Blog High Ed post.  I don’t remember whose post it was so I apologize.  FIR has been around for years and simply eluded me but it immediately became one of my favorite podcasts.  It’s hosted by Neville Hobson in England and Shel Holtz in California.  It’s intelligent, informative and full of news about marketing online, the latest developments in the technology and the emerging media.  It airs Mondays and Thursdays.

I also listen religiously to No Agenda, hosted by Adam Curry and John C. Dvorak.   Curry, a 1980s  MTV VeeJay turned entrepreneur was one of the pioneers in developing and promoting podcasting.   The two men are the odd couple of podcasting.  John is knowledgable, practical and a bit grumpy.  (In fact the contributing editor of PC  world  has another podcast called Cranky Geeks.)  Adam is a freewheeling guy whose sexual references and occasional R-rated language belies his extensive knowledge of the field and his entrepreneurial genius. (He’s the cofounder of Podshow, now mevio.)

Their niche is finding news that mainstream media ignores.  Their opinions, projections and conclusions are more often than not accurate and sometimes frightening.  They are refreshingly neither Republican or Democrat so the Obama adminsitration comes under the same scrutiny as the Republicans.  In a Democracy, we need this.

For fun I also listen to Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, the smartest, wittiest show anywhere.  Hosted by Peter Sagal and Carl Kasell the band of regulars and guests are unabashedly liberal with minds and tongues are rapier sharp.  It’s the only show that almost every week makes me laugh out loud.

I also read Ad Age online which remains the bellwether in the now volatile advertising world.

I continue to read and promote Blog High Ed, not just because I’m a member of the BHE family but because it remains a forum for a diverse group of bloggers who not only care about higher ed marketing and websites but who are also some of the sharpest of the cutting edge folks in the field. Several have gone on to start their own businesses and are fast emerging leaders in the profession.

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I’ve written in the past about words that are way overused.  I have come to absolutely cringe at  “literally.”  I think I’ve included it in my hated words list but I’m telling you, I hear this word every day by smart, educated people from FIR to Fresh Air.  What was once a good, upstanding, perfectly respectable word has become the Slumdog of the English language.  It has become mindless filler!  Or, as dictionary.com says, it now means “virtually” instead of it’s original meaning of “actually.”

I’m not going to change anything by complaining.  I’ll wait for it to run its course, like “irony” did a few years ago.

That’s all for today.

Literally!

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Sunday Afternoon Thoughts Part 16

In my last post, guest Dick Jones wrote about the demise of newspapers, happening in part because they refuse to let go of their double digit profits. Ad Age has begun a series entitled Newspaper Death Watch. The first installment mentions many of the same problems Dick did. I’ll be following this series and provide a link to each installment. Intriguing stuff.

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Related to the death of newspapers and the huge transition we’re experiencing in news gathering- dissemination (and PR and marketing) is Chris Brogan’s post on Some Differences Between Pitching Mainstream Press and Bloggers. There are some marked differences and, of course, a lot of similarities.

Most revealing are the responses when Chris Twittered his friends for their opinions. Read this in full and think about it. There’s a lot about passion, opinions, homework, freebies . . .oh, yes, and pimping.

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Martin Weller is a Professor of Educational Technology at the Open University in the UK. I’ve subscribed to his blog, The Ed Techie for quite awhile but, like everyone else, I don’t get to all my feeds as often as I’d like.

In the virtual world this April 7 post, Whither the Blogosphere, might be considered old, but it’s relevant, well-written and thoughtful. It’s about the possible trend of bloggers moving away from the blogosphere and into different forms of communication on the Web. Martin writes in part:

What I think is happening is another example of technology succession. The blog was the primary colonizer for the barren landscape of online identity. The presence of this colonizer changed the environment, which made it more amenable to secondary colonizers. . .

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I found this interesting entry on The Ed Techie’s recent post, Making Connections 2.0

Blogger Tony Hirst was criticized harshly at a conference for having his laptop to do some live blogging. Both his account and the comments give some great insights into the schism between traditionalists and 2.0 practitioners.

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John C. Dvorak, VP at the former Podshow, explains the name change to Mevio. His post is short and to the point. The 68 responses range from agreement, to anger to thoughts on the term “podcasting,” branding, search engines, etc. Again, interesting insights into our fast-changing times.

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Finally, I need your insights and ideas.

Three weeks ago I did the three-part post on the drug bust. A week later I followed it up with a report on another one. As I posted them, each one attracted a larger-than-usual number of views. They continued to get a steady but lower number of views, which is the norm. Then, Friday night, views of these posts suddenly jumped way, way up. The views continued growing throughout Saturday, giving me one of my top five days ever. Has this ever happened to anyone else?

Any ideas as to why this seemingly untimely explosion of interest?